a+standoff+in+the+green+room+with+anton+yelchin+and+imogen+poots review 

GREEN ROOM – “It’s not a conspiracy. It’s a clusterfuck.”

You had me at “Patrick Stewart: White Supremacist.” Green Room is an unconventional horror film, which succeeds by making believable and uncompromising decisions about how it plays out. To avoid spoilers, I’ll stick with the official log-line: “After witnessing a murder, a punk rock band is forced into a vicious fight for survival against a group of maniacal skinheads.” 

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The Jungle Book - Mowgli and Bagheera review 

THE JUNGLE BOOK – Welcome to the Jungle, We’ve Got Fun and Games

The Jungle Book: Jon Favreau’s 2016 “live action” remake of Walt Disney’s 1967 animated adaptation of Rudyard Kipling’s 1894 collection of short stories. Jon Favreau is a famously analogue director. His 2005 Zathura largely eschewed digital effects for practical props, and when he directed Iron Man in 2008 he refused to film the hero’s digital double in a way that couldn’t have been captured with practical aerial photography. But with the exception of its star, (12-years-old and charmingly rough around the edges) Neel Sethi, as Mowgli, Favreau’s Jungle Book is an entirely digital fabrication. Despite the fact that it apes a live action look, in actuality it is nearly as pure an animated feature as Disney’s original adaptation.

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Logan Marshall-Gree as Will in The Invitation review 

THE INVITATION – Killer Party, Man

Have you ever tried to socialize while you were severely depressed? Have you ever been to a social event hosted by an ex and been forced to meet her awkward new friends? Have you ever thought you had been invited to a party as a pawn in a nefarious plan? If you’ve never had the pleasure of experiencing all these at the same time, let The Invitation be your guide! 

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Hardcore Henry Fight review 

HARDCORE HENRY – Takes “Like a Videogame” As a Compliment

When I first saw the trailer for Hardcore Henry, the first thing I thought was, “What a stupid gimmick.” The second thing I thought was, “Why the hell has it taken Hollywood so long to try this!?!” The feature is a grand experiment in filmmaking. It’s not the first full length movie to ever be filmed entirely in the first person perspective (see the 1947 film Lady in the Lake for that distinction), but it’s certainly the first to use a head strapped GoPro camera to push the technique to its balls-to-the-wall limits. Needless to say, if you’re at all prone to motion sickness, you may want to pop some dramamine before watching.

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When Harry Met Sally - Someone is staring at You top 25 

WHEN HARRY MET SALLY… – “Someone is staring at you in Personal Growth”

When Harry Met Sally… is one of my favorite movies of all time. It’s also incredibly misunderstood. Early in the film, an obnoxious and young Harry, fresh out of college, states that “Men and women can’t be friends, because the sex part always gets in the way.” What follows in the film is a long term friendship that falls into sex, and subsequently romantic love. The quote is even repeated at the film’s end when Harry does, in fact, fall in love with Sally. Many have argued that this is the film’s theme and overarching message. A 2014 blog post by Reuters’ Chlo Angyal and another from 2012 by SplitSider’s Blythe Robertson are two recent analyses that support this theory. Both writers argue that the film sends an unhealthy message. I would agree with them that the concept is bullshit. I’m a heterosexual man, and I’m probably friends with more women than men. That said, I strongly disagree that “Men can’t be friends with women” is the theme or the message of the film.

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Charlie Cox as Daredevil and Jon Bernthal as The Punisher review 

DAREDEVIL (Season 2) – Punishingly Entertaining

In Season 2 of the standout Netflix/Marvel superhero drama, Daredevil, both the show and its titular hero begin to get comfortable with themselves, for better and for worse. Matt Murdock is tougher, more cocky, and is noticeably beginning to actually enjoy his violent escapades. Gone is the doubt and self reflection that plagued him in Season 1, which simultaneously makes him a more powerful hero and an insufferable know-it-all. What he’s gained in street cred, he’s lost in his ability to connect to others. Matt’s misguided descent in the world of his alter-ego is a crucial and purposeful part of his arc this season, but what’s interesting is that these same qualities extend to the show as a whole.

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