alex looking through her window in the charnel house trilogy review 

THE CHARNEL HOUSE TRILOGY – A decent short story in game format

Fans of horror and gothic horror may have already heard of THE CHARNEL HOUSE TRILOGY. Set in a format typical of 90’s point-and-click adventures, it has a relaxed feel that encourages you to casually explore your surroundings, unravel the story and learn about the protagonist you play as. You start the game as Alex, a gothy 20-something girl living in New York who’s preparing to get out of the city for the weekend. Madeleine Roux (author of Asylum) makes her voice acting debut here, adding charmingly sarcastic witticisms as you click…

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review 

STRANGER THINGS (Season 1) – Turning the 80’s up to ELEVEN

If you read no further in this review, please take away this. You need to watch Stranger Things, and you need to watch it now. Go home now and binge the eight-episode Netflix original. Not because the story does anything new. It doesn’t. If you’ve seen, Jaws, E.T., The Goonies, A Nightmare on Elm Street, Poltergeist, Scanners, The Thing, Alien, The Twilight Zone, or The X-Files, you’re going to recognize some of the moments, concepts, tropes, themes, and iconography that made those properties so famous. The reason you need to see…

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Ghostbusters 2016 review 

GHOSTBUSTERS – Bustin’ Makes Me Feel Good

The level of vitriol that has been directed towards the lady-led Ghostbusters reboot is beyond the pale. Over at my day job at Screen Rant, every Ghostbusters related news update is met by at least a few comments telling us we shouldn’t even be reporting on it. As if, like the mainstream media’s coverage of Donald Trump, we are treating a great evil in the world as normal, and should really just stop giving it attention. Hilarious, considering the “controversy” they are stirring is turning the reboot of a comedy…

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The BFG - Friendship review 

THE BFG: Too Big For it’s Own Good

The BFG comes to us courtesy of Steven Spielberg’s Amblin Entertainment and Disney. The film is every bit as full of whimsy that a pairing  between these two would suggest. Based on the novel by Roald Dahl (Charlie and the Chocolate Factory), the film follows a 10-year-old orphan named Sophie, who gets kidnapped by an otherwise Big and Friendly Giant, and finds herself with problems altogether unfamiliar to those from her previous life. Let’s focus on the good first. The acting in this movie is delightful. Ruby Barnhill, whose name…

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review 

SWISS ARMY MAN – Life is a Fart Joke

Swiss Army Man is storytelling at its finest. It’s immature, gross, insecure, ridiculous, and deeply, deeply human. Its profundity doesn’t come in spite of its base nature, but because of it. It explores the shame we have in being dead men walking, and the pretense in imagining that we’re more than a brain/soul/what-have-you piloting a walking, talking, farting meat robot. It’s a weird, meandering, sometimes depressing movie that may turn you off entirely, and you absolutely must see it.

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review 

INDEPENDENCE DAY: RESURGENCE – “Get ready for a close encounter, bitch!”

Independence Day: Resurgence bears the distinction of being one of the dumbest films I’ve seen that still technically does everything right. There was never any need for a sequel to the eminently 90’s ID4, yet here we are with a film that somehow manages to be even bigger and more explody than dozens of city-wide spaceships annihilating all of the world’s major cities.

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Finding Dory in a Cup review 

FINDING DORY – “Just keep swimming…”

I wasn’t a huge fan of Finding Nemo. The film was enormously successful for Pixar and one of its biggest crowd pleasers. I thought it was cute, but that the plot structure was really meandering, and that its message was weak compared to a lot of Pixar’s best. Worst of all, I didn’t connect to the protagonist Marlin (Albert Brooks). In fact, I actively dislike him. I don’t see Marlin as having any positive character traits. He’s a neurotic, snippy worrywart. Sure, he loves his son. He’s not a monster. But honestly, Nemo’s blank slate innocence and growing up story was a far more compelling part of the story to me.

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Lothar Diving into Combat in Warcraft review 

WARCRAFT – As “Not Terrible” as Game Adaptations Come

Movies based on video games are never “good”. Often they’ve been “godawful” (Super Mario Bros.), with a few falling into the so-bad-they’re-good category (DOA: Dead or Alive). The best they ever get is “okay” (Resident Evil), with the vast majority falling into the “bland” (Prince of Persia) or “gimmicky” (Final Fantasy) categories. So it may surprise you when I say that I really enjoyed Warcraft, While it certainly has no shortage of “bland” elements, and stumbles over a lot of chances it had to excel, I think it’s about as close as I’ve seen to a video game adaptation being “good” without actually earning that qualifier. It certainly has enough standout qualities for me to call it “above average”. As The Powerwaifu so aptly put it, “I wouldn’t kick it out of bed.” 

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Popstar - Andy Samberg is Humble review 

POPSTAR: NEVER STOP NEVER STOPPING – Never Stop Laughing

I can’t imagine a better Lonely Island movie than Popstar: Never Stop Never Stopping. Everything that works about the musical comedy trio of Andy Samberg, Akiva Schaffer, and Jorma Taccone is operating on overdrive here, from the obvious chemistry that the trio have as long time friends to the satire of the self-important pop culture attitude. If you’ve heard “I’m On a Boat,” you’ll know exactly the kind of hilariously narcissistic nonsense that Popstar has in store.

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Colin Farell and Rachel Weisz in The Lobster review 

THE LOBSTER – A Thoughtful Stroll Through Dystopia

The Lobster is a difficult movie to describe, but people who’ve seen Terry Gilliam‘s Brazil will have a general idea of the odd, stilted, cynical humor that makes the film unique in its class. The two films also share semi-sci-fi dystopian premises, but grand production design and a sense of adventure is nowhere to be found in The Lobster. The film is, perhaps, one of the most atypical examples of an indie rom-com that I’ve seen.

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